REFINE 

Browse All : Images from 1836

1-15 of 15
Part of the Florida and Providence Channels
Part of the Florida and...
1836
Owen, Commander Richard
 
Short Title Part of the Florida and Providence Channels
Year 1836
Author Owen, Commander Richard
A Map Part of Alabama & Florida
A Map Part of Alabama &...
1836
Palmer, William R.
 
Short Title A Map Part of Alabama & Florida
Year 1836
Author Palmer, William R.
Plan of the New City of Pensacola from recent and accurate survey
Plan of the New City of...
1836
G.E. Chase
 
Short Title Plan of the New City of Pensacola from recent and accurate survey
Year 1836
Author G.E. Chase
Camp Izard on the Ouithlacoochee River
Camp Izard on the Ouith...
1836
 
Short Title Camp Izard on the Ouithlacoochee River
Year 1836
The West Indies from the Best Authorities. Second map titled "Map of Florida according to the latest authorities"
The West Indies from th...
1836
S. Augustus Mitchell
 
Short Title The West Indies from the Best Authorities. Second map titled "Map of Florida according to the latest authorities"
Year 1836
Author S. Augustus Mitchell
Copy of a map of the seat of war in Florida, forwarded to the War Department by Major Genl. W. Scott, U.S.A.
Copy of a map of the se...
1836
Lieut J.E. Johnson
 
Short Title Copy of a map of the seat of war in Florida, forwarded to the War Department by Major Genl. W. Scott, U.S.A.
Year 1836
Author Lieut J.E. Johnson
Land District East Territory of Florida
Land District East Terr...
1836
 
Short Title Land District East Territory of Florida
Year 1836
Pensacola Harbor and Bar, Florida
Pensacola Harbor and Ba...
1836
Major James Kearney, to...
Related
 
Short Title Pensacola Harbor and Bar, Florida
Year 1836
Author Major James Kearney, topo engineers, and Lieutenants Thompson, Turnbull, and Butler, 4th artillery
Map of the seat of war in Florida.
Map of the seat of war ...
1836
Creator not given
 
Short Title Map of the seat of war in Florida.
Year 1836
Author Creator not given
A map of the seat of war in Florida.
A map of the seat of wa...
1836
Creator not given
 
Short Title A map of the seat of war in Florida.
Year 1836
Author Creator not given
Copy of a map of the seat of war in Florida.
Copy of a map of the se...
1836
Lieut. J.E. Johnson
Related
 
Short Title Copy of a map of the seat of war in Florida.
Year 1836
Author Lieut. J.E. Johnson
Copy of a map of the seat of war in Florida.
Copy of a map of the se...
1836
Lieut. J.E. Johnson
Related
 
Short Title Copy of a map of the seat of war in Florida.
Year 1836
Author Lieut. J.E. Johnson
Copy of a Map of the Seat of War in Florida
Copy of a Map of the Se...
1836
Lieut. J. E. Johnson
 
Short Title Copy of a Map of the Seat of War in Florida
Year 1836
Author Lieut. J. E. Johnson
Carta Esferica de las costas del seno mexicano Direccion Hidrografica
Carta Esferica de las c...
1836
Direccion Hidrografica
 
Short Title Carta Esferica de las costas del seno mexicano Direccion Hidrografica
Year 1836
Author Direccion Hidrografica
H.S. Tanner 1836 Map of Florida Second Seminole War Edition of Tanner's Map of Florida Territory Tanner's first map of Florida is one of the earliest obtainable maps of Florida Territory. The first edition of the map is virtually identical to Charles Vignole's map of 1823, with the only difference being the lack of Vignole's name on the map. First issued in 1823, the second state of the map shows the addition of Gadsden County, whereas only St. Johns, Duval, Jackson and Escambia counties are shown in the 1823 edition. This 1836 edition shows significant changes, many of which related to the Second Seminole War. The original St. Johns County in the south is now subdivided into Monroe, Mosquito, Hillsboro, Dade, and Alachua Counties, with a massive area in the center (yellow) called Mackley's, in what was then largely unexplored parts of Hillsboro County, including Miranda's Grant, Ft. Alabama, Fort King, Dade's Battle Ground, Camp Chisolm, Pilaklakaha Village, Chichuchaty and Ft. Cooper. Richard Hackley's Grant The map also shows "Mackley's". Mackley is a reference to Richard Hackley, a U.S. diplomat. Hackley purchased approximately 11 Million acres of Florida land from the Duke of Alagon�s land grant on May 29, 1819. However, the duke didn�t own the land at the time. Hackley�s purchase came as the U.S. was negotiating the purchase of East and West Florida from the Spanish government. During the negotiations with Spain, Several Americans tried to purchase large sections of Florida land. It prompted American officials to request a proclamation from the King of Spain to declare all grants and land purchases void if made after a certain date. Hackley�s purchase came after the date, so his purchase was voided. In 1823, Hackley either did not know or did not care about the status of his land grant. Hackley arrived on the banks of the Hillsborough River and cleared some land on the eastern side in what is now downtown Tampa. In January 1824, Lt. Colonel George Mercer Brooke arrived with more than 100 U.S. infantry soldiers to establish what soon became known as Fort Brooke. Brooke moved into the structure Hackley built as his homestead. Hackley came back to his settlement and found it had become an army fort. Hackley sued the federal government, as did his heirs at different points over the next 80 years. The war department decommissioning Fort Brooke in 1883 likely prompted the last round of lawsuits. Four families made claims. Many others attempted to just settle on the property and claim squatters' right. The US Supreme Court finally ruled against the Homesteaders and in favor of the U.S. Government's claim the Hackley's and others claims were voided.
H.S. Tanner 1836 Map of...
1836
 
Short Title H.S. Tanner 1836 Map of Florida Second Seminole War Edition of Tanner's Map of Florida Territory Tanner's first map of Florida is one of the earliest obtainable maps of Florida Territory. The first edition of the map is virtually identical to Charles Vignole's map of 1823, with the only difference being the lack of Vignole's name on the map. First issued in 1823, the second state of the map shows the addition of Gadsden County, whereas only St. Johns, Duval, Jackson and Escambia counties are shown in the 1823 edition. This 1836 edition shows significant changes, many of which related to the Second Seminole War. The original St. Johns County in the south is now subdivided into Monroe, Mosquito, Hillsboro, Dade, and Alachua Counties, with a massive area in the center (yellow) called Mackley's, in what was then largely unexplored parts of Hillsboro County, including Miranda's Grant, Ft. Alabama, Fort King, Dade's Battle Ground, Camp Chisolm, Pilaklakaha Village, Chichuchaty and Ft. Cooper. Richard Hackley's Grant The map also shows "Mackley's". Mackley is a reference to Richard Hackley, a U.S. diplomat. Hackley purchased approximately 11 Million acres of Florida land from the Duke of Alagon�s land grant on May 29, 1819. However, the duke didn�t own the land at the time. Hackley�s purchase came as the U.S. was negotiating the purchase of East and West Florida from the Spanish government. During the negotiations with Spain, Several Americans tried to purchase large sections of Florida land. It prompted American officials to request a proclamation from the King of Spain to declare all grants and land purchases void if made after a certain date. Hackley�s purchase came after the date, so his purchase was voided. In 1823, Hackley either did not know or did not care about the status of his land grant. Hackley arrived on the banks of the Hillsborough River and cleared some land on the eastern side in what is now downtown Tampa. In January 1824, Lt. Colonel George Mercer Brooke arrived with more than 100 U.S. infantry soldiers to establish what soon became known as Fort Brooke. Brooke moved into the structure Hackley built as his homestead. Hackley came back to his settlement and found it had become an army fort. Hackley sued the federal government, as did his heirs at different points over the next 80 years. The war department decommissioning Fort Brooke in 1883 likely prompted the last round of lawsuits. Four families made claims. Many others attempted to just settle on the property and claim squatters' right. The US Supreme Court finally ruled against the Homesteaders and in favor of the U.S. Government's claim the Hackley's and others claims were voided.
Year 1836
1-15 of 15